Together with our partner Science Year 2016*17, we initiated the “sub:marine” track at re:publica 2017 which had a focus on exciting questions regarding ocean habitats and the sustainable use of our natural resources. We looked at fascinating technologies being implemented in our planet's seas and discuss topics of Open Sea Data and the Internet of Things of the Ocean. We also focused on how we can make science even more exciting and aesthetically accessible.

The world's oceans contain unexplored secrets and potentials. What has long been the stuff of pop-culture stories is already being implemented in the fields of biology, medicine, and mobility and being tested for the demands of the future. While we still can't call the sea our home we can be witnesses to the first steps on our way to transforming more of it into a place for life and creation. These experiments range from food production, harvesting raw materials needed for medication, to aquiring materials for fuel production. The fashion industry has also shown an interest in what our oceans have to offer. But how can we ensure that our planet's waters can be used sustainably and without endangering them?

Increasing human intervention into ocean habitats is causing growing pollution and exploitation, severely disrupting the balance of their ecosystems. Rising sea temperatures, coral bleaching, and the enormous fields of plastics in the oceans are worrying side-effects of our intensive use of the seas. How do scientists and researchers tackle these problems? We have to face these challenges head on and use the Science Year 2016*17 to facilitate exciting dialogue on controversial topics from the field of sea and ocean research.

About the topic of Science Year 2016*17

Sea and ocean research is the core topic of Science Year 2016*17. Seas and oceans cover nearly 70 percent of our planet. They act as climate regulators, food sources, economic spaces – and are habitats for many plant and animal life. Scientists have been studying the oceans for decades; yet they remain mysterious and largely unexplored. Science Year 2016*17 focuses on the exploration of the seas and oceans, their preservation, and their sustainable use. The Science Years are an initiative by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) together with Wissenschaft im Dialog (Science in Dialogue, WiD). Together they are a key instrument of scientific communication in bringing current research to the wider population and support dialogue between research and society. Science Year 2016*17 is supported by their consultant partners German Marine Research Consortium (KDM).

 

 

Image credit: re:publica (CC BY 2.0)

  • sub:marine
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    The degradation of the marine environment has thus far outpaced the development of international ocean governance. In 2017 the international community has the opportunity to agree on concrete steps to improve ocean sustainability. States will have to decide on the negotiation of a new agreement for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity on the “High Seas”. The UN Ocean Conference in June will seek to agree commitments from States and other stakeholders to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals for the oceans, seas, and marine resources. This talk will explore what is needed to improve the way we govern and manage the oceans and what can be expected from current policy processes in international ocean governance.
  • 14 tracks, 500 hours, 700 speakers – keeping an overview with this much on offer isn’t easy, but we’ll be taking you through it, bit by bit. In this second edition, the programme team presents you more from the #rp17.

     

  • sub:marine
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    Aquatocene / The subaquatic quest for serenity investigates the phenomenon of underwater noise pollution created by humankind in the seas and oceans. The sound compositions are a re-mix between the bioacoustics of marine life (shrimps, fish, sea urchins etc.), the aquatic acoustics and the presence of human generated noise in the world’s oceans and seas. The project will be presented as a A-V performance.


  • sub:marine
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    In this workshop with artist Robertina Šebjanič and science hacker Lucy Patterson we will build simple DIY hydrophones for non invasive exploration of underwater worlds – a starting point to rethink our understanding of life in the world’s oceans and the human impact on the marine environment.
  • sub:marine
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    Dieser Vortrag erzählt davon, wie die Tiefsee erforscht wird und wie in den letzten Jahrzehnten durch bemannte und unbemannte Tauchfahrzeuge bisher unbekannte, hochproduktive Ökosysteme entdeckt wurden.

    Da der Mensch nicht die Tiefsee begehen kann wie Astronauten den Mond, geschieht die Erkundung und Entdeckung solcher Lebensräume vor allem mittels digitaler Techniken – Roboter übertragen Bilder und Daten, die Wissenschaftler und Tauchpiloten sitzen auf dem Forschungsschiff und müssen die Informationen integrieren um sich in der Tiefe zurecht zu finden und Lebensräume zu kartieren zu und beproben.
  • sub:marine
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    Could the future of the planet depend upon our response to the imminent mining operations about to be unleashed in the depths of the oceans, and how can an art organisation engage on a structural level with a complex issue like this, avoiding to be purely figurative or just a communications tool.
  • sub:marine
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    Practically, you will learn to culture the bacteria from the sea on agar plates and then grow it at home until it glows beautifully.
  • sub:marine
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    Der Ostsee geht es so wie vielen Küstenmeeren weltweit. Es gibt
    viele Nutzer mit diversen, zum Teil nicht zu vereinbarenden Ansprüchen an das
    Ökosystem. Einer von Deutschlands führenden Meeresforschern hilft uns bei der Navigation der Zukunft der Ozeane:
    Was werden wir in den Weiten der Ozeane noch entdecken?
    Wer nutzt unser Küstenmeer und wie? Welche Bedeutung haben
    Schifffahrtsstraßen für unseren Wohlstand? Welche Auswirkungen hat der
    Meeresspiegelanstieg für unsere Küsten? Wie ging es, wie geht es
    und wie wird es der Ostsee in Zukunft gehen? Welche Maßnahmen zur nachhaltigen
    Nutzung sind jetzt zu ergreifen?
  • sub:marine
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    “Fishy” technology to stop overfishing:

    This session will address the problem of overfishing, its causes and possible solutions. In order to maintain healthy marine ecosystems, we need to be informed and keep our governments accountable over their decisions that concern the environment and our future. Technology can help us in the quest to manage fish stocks and marine protected areas in a better and more transparent way.
  • Fashiontech Lab Berlin
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    Shaping jewellery from bioluminescent bacteria. Ocean microorganisms are harnessed and integrated into wearable jewellery. How can we begin to think more creatively about designing with biology? This black box glows inside, featuring a live community of Photobacterium Phosphoreum.
  • sub:marine
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    Daten sind die Grundlage der empirischen Wissenschaften. Das Generieren und Kuratieren von Daten wird mehr und mehr zu einer eigenständigen Disziplin im Wissenschaftsbetrieb. Das Informationssystem PANGAEA erleichtert es, Daten zu finden und sie für alternative Forschungsfragen nachzunutzen. So sind zum Beispiel ältere Daten – kombiniert mit neuen Forschungsergebnissen – die Grundlage alternativer Modelle in der Erd- und Klimaforschung.
  • sub:marine
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    Weltweit arbeiten Theaterschaffende zum Thema anthropogener Klimawandel. Das Theater kann die Zuschauer*innen (in Zusammenarbeit mit der Wissenschaft) auf die klimatischen Veränderungen vorbereiten, mit ihren Folgen leben lernen und den weltgesellschaftlichen Dialog über das Thema auf lokaler Ebene anregen. Es bietet die Chance, die Auseinandersetzung mit dem Klimawandel zu emotionalisieren. Dies ist unabdingbar neben der Information durch die Wissenschaft.